Ode to the Howling Moon

Truths by Ruth

greg's moon

What is it about the moon that holds me so?
Sparks my innards and touches the soul?
Deep in the wilds as a jaguar I did growl
And ran with wind, free to howl.

I feel kinship to this silver orb shining in the inky sky.
It boils the blood and makes me itch to fly
On backs of dragons. Or Unicorns. Or broomsticks
As a black cat on the end who hisses and spits.

Orange, with purple and red swirls.
Heavenly light so close to the earth.
This be my calling. My purpose for birth.
For a Howling Moon its been said
Frees the spirits and redeems the dead.

A Howling Moon so beautiful it bubbles the blood
Makes me stand in its magic light so full.
So powerful, I surrender to its pull
To draw the circle, cast the spell
And write the story that only I, Bethany…

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Conversation Around a Camp Fire

Character development is a great deal of the fun of writing.

Pamela Foster, Author and Speaker

osage warriorCreation myths reveal the original culture of a people. Oh, we shift and grow and turn to the left and the right over thousands of years, but still our view of this life is colored with how our ancestors explained their existence on this earth.
In The Long Journey Home series, between narrow escapes and the killing of those that need killing, Jeremiah and Montego spend time chewing the fat around a campfire. Part of the fun of writing these novels is the conversations these two men have while sitting under the stars.

Jeremiah, a haunted confederate soldier in the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, is an educated, well-read man. Montego, an Osage who also knows the burden of fighting hard and losing a war, was educated by Jesuits. Both men learned much of what they know of the world in battle.
So, sitting around a fire under the stars, gnawing…

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Why a Western?

Pamela Foster, Author and Speaker

Ridgeline_rev-01

Ridgeline is my fifth published book. None of my previous works are westerns.
So then why, at this stage of my career, would I choose to write in a genre that is, according the geniuses in New York, writhing in its death throes? Well, first of all, it’s been a good many years since I’ve given much credence to the opinions of strangers.

Secondly Jeremiah Jones, the main character in Ridgeline, appeared to me, and like most cowboys, the man is as stubborn as a dang Missouri mule. He simply refused to leave until I told the story. Finally, in an attempt to rid myself of the man, I sat down to write a short story.
Ah, huh. Every writer out there knows how THAT goes. I’m now 50,000 words into The Rainmaker, the sequel for Ridgeline, with another two or three books in the series bouncing…

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